Back to the Digital Drawing Board

Image

I started this Paper 53 piece last evening while stationed – along with 5 other Art Hop artists – at Cue Spot Billiards in downtown Merced, CA. The emotion that I wanted to convey was linked to my finding out that none of my digital painting entrees was selected by jurors for inclusion into this year’s top one hundred at the Mobile and Digital Arts and Creativity Summit (mDAC) 2017. You may recall that I had a piece selected in mDAC 2016 and one in mDAC 2015. This year’s winners are really awesome, click here to take a peek. So, I’m a little disappointed; but, I’m using the development as an opportunity to re-evaluate my artistic vision as part of the coaching and rebranding process that I’m currently engaged in. In that process I’m trying to articulate not so much what I do, or even how I do what I do, but rather why I do it. I’m having some insights, thanks to Adam James Butcher’s coaching process. So let me go back to piecing together some things and dismantling others.

The Customary 2014 In Review Canned Report

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2014 annual report for portfoliolongo.com.

Here’s an excerpt:

A New York City subway train holds 1,200 people. This blog was viewed about 8,000 times in 2014. If it were a NYC subway train, it would take about 7 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

Nobody Likes Change (or Complexity)

I once heard a change-management consultant tell a conference room full of hospital administrators, physicians, and staff … “the only person who likes change is a baby with a wet diaper.” (Hey, I subsequently dealt with this image, click here to see.) I was one of those administrators in that conference room in New Orleans about six months after Hurricane Katrina at a hospital whose survival depended upon a very deliberate and systematic organizational transformation; and yet the natural forces of resistance to change – among the victimized and exhausted few who were not temporarily or permanently displaced – were functional and ready for a good fight. It’s only natural. However, there was no alternative in this case. The organizational and structural changes simply had to take place and the resistance to change had to become collaboration in change; and this happened in large part due to an extraordinarily unique combination of chronic passion (joie de vivre) and acute Katrina fatigue in an extraordinarily unique context in an extraordinarily unique city.

However, when the need for change is perceived as optional and any sense of urgency is a matter of opinion, development efforts can drag on for years, resistance to change can become business as usual, and collaboration can be confined to ongoing turf battles. Even when complicated baseline findings of the communities’ perceived needs are available and displayed along side the communities’ complicated aspirations for all to compare, there can be voices crying out for simplicity and ease … but not for change.

image-4

 

If I ever do this again, I’ll try to remember to start off with that catchy quote about the baby, the diapers, and change, which reminds me of a drawing/post I have up my sleeve about calzones and how I suspect that this term, which means pants, really comes from little, little pants…diapers?  The fullness of diapers?