About portfoliolongo.com

ARTIST'S STATEMENT: I want my artwork to comfort the afflicted and to afflict the comfortable. I want it to shed light and call attention to beauty, coherence, and unity; and, I want it to cast doubt on falsehoods, oversimplifications, and absurdities. I’d like to be instrumental in deepening our awareness and appreciation of the fullness of life, including its complexities, ambiguities, and paradoxes. I draw and paint on an iPad with an Apple Pencil or my fingers using a variety of drawing/painting apps; although, I still work in wood and clay as well. iPads are portable and versatile, require little set up, and there’s no clean up. They’re the perfect medium for what I do. I can quickly convert ideas into illustrations and share them or time-lapse videos of them on social media. I can also prepare the images for printing on metal, paper, and canvas surfaces in a variety of sizes. BIOGRAPHY: Paul Longo has lived a relatively unconventional life. In his youth, he plowed through dyslexia (before teachers had ever heard of it) and learned that there is, indeed, more than meets the eye. In college, he read Don Quijote in Spanish for the first time and discovered an interest in anthropology. He went on to complete 3 graduate degrees and has lived and worked in 7 countries and 9 states since then. Paul has taught anthropology, education, Spanish, research and evaluation methods, and ESL at 6 different universities. These days he teaches digital art to adults with developmental disabilities and non-credit ESL to adults at a local community college. Paul was also a Benedictine monk and lived in a monastery for nearly 8 years, until he met and married his wife. Together they were survivors of Hurricane Katrina as residents of New Orleans. But it was not until 2013, while living in a downtown loft in Des Moines, Iowa, that Paul complained to his wife, a CIO in higher education, about not having either a basement or a garage in which to make art. A few days later she gave Paul her old iPad with an installed drawing app and said, “here’s a studio for your lap.” Since then, not only have iPads become larger and more powerful, but the number of drawing and painting apps has increased and each one offers a unique set of features to create original artwork. Nowadays, Paul takes his "studio” everywhere he goes. Throughout his eclectic journey, Paul has created and shared his art to make sense of the world, to give voice to new identities and experiences, and to engage more intentionally with others. To view more of Paul Longo’s works, digital and otherwise, visit his social media sites: www.portfoliolongo.com, twitter, YouTube, Instagram: @plongeaux, Facebook: Paul J. Longo

Cartoon Clean Up

At the suggestion of some of you, I’ve tried submitting cartoons to the New Yorker, but it’s tough. I submitted Rear View Mirror Check on Jan. 2, 2018, and it was “declined” on Feb. 14, 2018. So, you see, it took them a month and a half to notify me.

There are ground rules and so many implicit evaluation criteria to consider. First, anything submitted cannot be published anywhere else. That means not posting it on this my illustroblog, not on FaceBook, not on Instagram, nowhere! Then there are the other criteria related to quality, irony, humor, timeliness, etc.. Good editorial cartoonists are brilliant, fast, courageous, and otherwise remarkable people in so many ways. What they do on a daily basis blows my mind. They inspire me to keep trying; and, they crack me up.

Besides Rear View Mirror Check, I’ve submitted 10 others from Sept. 2018 to as recent as March 14, 2020; and, I’ve withdrawn all ten of them for one reason or another, mainly because enough time had expired that the cartoon was no longer timely or relevant. Then I toss them into my Trump Gallery and throw them up on FaceBook and Instagram.

So here are 5 cartoons (with submission date) that I withdrew today (March 23, 2020), starting from oldest to newest.

Submitted: Feb, 20, 2020

Ditto Birds

Submitted: Feb. 29, 2020

That Hat

Submitted: March 1, 2020

Start All Over

Submitted: March 8, 2020

While You’re At It

Submitted: March 12, 2020

Nobody But ME

What I’ve Learned from my Eleven Year Shit Show

I’ve reblogged posts from my neice, Linda before. She always has something to say, and it’s never based on vicarious experience. She’s generous, direct, and funny. So, from the bottom of my heart – via my funny bone – I share this post for your benefit and for the possible benefit of those in your circles just in case you sense any tangible or intangible applicability.

LindaBP

I spent the entire weekend documenting everything I’ve tried for my MS. Thank God for iCal, my Amazon order history and the “purchase” file I keep in my email app. I’m not surprised by the vast majority of medicines, therapies and equipment as much as I’m shocked at what I forgot. For example I literally had no memory of taking an expensive medication as well as many treatments until stumbling upon them in my digital calendar.

At this point I need to stop, post and hit publish. Over the next few weeks I’ll be describing what’s been working for me these last two years. In the meantime if you have a specific question about what I’ve tried at any point feel free to ask in the comment section or message me.

And no, I didn’t have the courage to tally up how much this has cost me out of pocket.

One…

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Jack Fine at the Old Point Bar in Algiers Point

In 2005 Ann and I moved to New Orleans and wound up buying a house in Algiers Point, 420 Alix St. to be exact. I especially loved the “420” part from the start. Good thing because, little did we know, Hurricane Katrina hit four months after we got there, but that’s another story. A few weeks before Ann and Jaxin showed up in late April, I had already moved in and started getting as much ready around the house as possible for their arrival. On my second night there, I strolled down to the Old Point Bar just a few blocks away. There was live music, so I found a place at the bar and ordered a beer. I can’t remember the name of the band, but I loved their sound. I sat there sipping my beer and listening to the music, and all of a sudden, the guy sitting next to me – at the bar – started playing his trumpet. Yes, he started playing his trumpet from his seat at the bar right next to me! I remember thinking, “live fucking music!”

That man’s name was Jack Fine. Look him up! He’s a legend. I’m not the one to tell you who he is or who he was. I just know he’s been all over. We talked during a break, and every time I’d see him after that, on a regular basis here and there, we’d greet each other and continue the same conversation. I got to meet the man before the legend.

I was thinking about Jack Fine earlier today, so I searched Google for a photo so I could sped some time with him, drawing him from a reference photo from this source. Ladies and gentlemen, Jack Fine:

Jack Fine

Jack Fine

If you know or knew Jack Fine or of you’re familiar with his music/life, please use the comment section to share your two cents. Thank you.

Technical; I drew the image free hand using the photo at the embedded link above on an iPad Pro with an Apple Pencil using the Sketch Club app along with a tweak or two in a cool iPad app called iColorama.

Black and Gold Fever

I needed a “yinz” refrigerator magnet to go with our “jagoff” magnet. The display at the Pittsburgh International Airport sports and sociolinguistics paraphernalia shop was attractive. This digital painting took 2 hours and 25 minutes, and I used the Sketch Club app, my iPad Pro, and Apple Pencil to execute 3,040 brush strokes followed by a tweak or two in iColorama.
PIT to DFW