About portfoliolongo.com

ARTIST'S STATEMENT: I want my artwork to comfort the afflicted and to afflict the comfortable. I want it to shed light and call attention to beauty, coherence, and unity; and, I want it to cast doubt on falsehoods, oversimplifications, and absurdities. I’d like to be instrumental in deepening our awareness and appreciation of the fullness of life, including its complexities, ambiguities, and paradoxes. I draw and paint on an iPad with an Apple Pencil or my fingers using a variety of drawing/painting apps; although, I still work in wood and clay as well. iPads are portable and versatile, require little set up, and there’s no clean up. They’re the perfect medium for what I do. I can quickly convert ideas into illustrations and share them or time-lapse videos of them on social media. I can also prepare the images for printing on metal, paper, and canvas surfaces in a variety of sizes. BIOGRAPHY: Paul Longo has lived a relatively unconventional life. In his youth, he plowed through dyslexia (before teachers had ever heard of it) and learned that there is, indeed, more than meets the eye. In college, he read Don Quijote in Spanish for the first time and discovered an interest in anthropology. He went on to complete 3 graduate degrees and has lived and worked in 7 countries and 9 states since then. Paul has taught anthropology, education, Spanish, research and evaluation methods, and ESL at 6 different universities. These days he teaches digital art to adults with developmental disabilities and non-credit ESL to adults at a local community college. Paul was also a Benedictine monk and lived in a monastery for nearly 8 years, until he met and married his wife. Together they were survivors of Hurricane Katrina as residents of New Orleans. But it was not until 2013, while living in a downtown loft in Des Moines, Iowa, that Paul complained to his wife, a CIO in higher education, about not having either a basement or a garage in which to make art. A few days later she gave Paul her old iPad with an installed drawing app and said, “here’s a studio for your lap.” Since then, not only have iPads become larger and more powerful, but the number of drawing and painting apps has increased and each one offers a unique set of features to create original artwork. Nowadays, Paul takes his "studio” everywhere he goes. Throughout his eclectic journey, Paul has created and shared his art to make sense of the world, to give voice to new identities and experiences, and to engage more intentionally with others. To view more of Paul Longo’s works, digital and otherwise, visit his social media sites: www.portfoliolongo.com, twitter, YouTube, Instagram: @plongeaux, Facebook: Paul J. Longo

Camilo José Cela

I’ve been thinking a lot about tremendismo lately even though it’s been years since I read La Familia de Pascual Duarte and La Colmena. I’ll set aside the politics and philosophy and focus instead on Cela’s beautiful face.

Coronatrumpeting

Here’s one I’d been thinking about for a few weeks, (check out the stats info from Sketch Club below the image, which doesn’t include 2 minutes in iColorama for final tweaking.)

Stats info:

It’s been quite a spring!

My wife definitely has a green thumb, which means I get to enjoy the sight and aroma of many different types of flowers. This year I was moved to paint – or at least attempt to paint – some of them: irises, lilies, and a flowering variegated bower vine. I rendered all of them on an iPad Pro with an Apple Pencil using Sketch Club and iColorama.

Iris.

Lily

Flowering Bower Vine

The #TimeVirus

The digital art piece I present below, entitled The #TimeVirus, was partially inspired by the following short talk by Eckhart Tolle, in which he refers to the experience of grief and the virus that will finally get us all, if another virus or something else doesn’t get us first, time.

I painted the Neanderthal image on an iPad Pro using Procreate and posted it back in 2016, (see post here including details on the Neanderthal skull). I created the background in Tayasui Sketches and “liquified” it in Procreate in 2019 (see that image further on down). Tolle’s talk prompted me to combine and adjust the two in Procreate and then iColorama as a way of making sense of the corona virus and reactions to it.

I hope you like the image and especially Tolle’s talk!

The #TimeVirus

Liquified Background

Liquified Background

 

Spending Extra Time with Those Who’ve Departed

In the last couple of weeks I’ve spent a fair amount of time on my iPad Pro rendering digital paintings of two friends, both musicians, both from Athens, OH, Jerry Schaffer and Bruce Ergood, who’ve recently passed away, and it’s beginning to become clearer or me that doing so, painting portraits of the dearly departed, creates an unusually liminal opportunity for me to spend bonus or lagniappe time with them. I’ve done it before, see my posts on Cuthbert or Lotfi, two examples that immediately come to mind; however, I’m only now coming to terms with certain dimensions of this experience.

The experience is obviously built on fond memories. Memories surface that evoke thoughts and feelings tied to familiar facial characteristics and other reminders as reflected in the photo references I use. Beyond that I can’t really add much; except that “muscle memory” and “day dreaming” are involved. It’s kinda’ improvisational and transcendental. In some ways it’s memory spilling into the Present Moment and being resurrected forever in the Now that tends to constantly escape us but that’s always there, or rather Here.

It was helpful in many ways having conversed by phone with Jerry’s Robin and Bruce’s Jane before digitally and free-handedly painting the portraits and experiencing this unexpected, extramural connection. The immediate grief embedded in those conversations continues to reverberate, which is helping me reprioritize things in my life as I age and, more broadly speaking, as we move into uncharted territories in relation to COVID 19. In both conversations this grief was scrambled and amplified by the pandemic, making what is already painfully real – really painful. And yet, grief has a way of shedding a new light on an old world, since, afterall, there’s no turning back.

Rest in Peace, Jerry (see obit):

Rest in Peace, Brucito (see obit):

Cartoon Clean Up

At the suggestion of some of you, I’ve tried submitting cartoons to the New Yorker, but it’s tough. I submitted Rear View Mirror Check on Jan. 2, 2018, and it was “declined” on Feb. 14, 2018. So, you see, it took them a month and a half to notify me.

There are ground rules and so many implicit evaluation criteria to consider. First, anything submitted cannot be published anywhere else. That means not posting it on this my illustroblog, not on FaceBook, not on Instagram, nowhere! Then there are the other criteria related to quality, irony, humor, timeliness, etc.. Good editorial cartoonists are brilliant, fast, courageous, and otherwise remarkable people in so many ways. What they do on a daily basis blows my mind. They inspire me to keep trying; and, they crack me up.

Besides Rear View Mirror Check, I’ve submitted 10 others from Sept. 2018 to as recent as March 14, 2020; and, I’ve withdrawn all ten of them for one reason or another, mainly because enough time had expired that the cartoon was no longer timely or relevant. Then I toss them into my Trump Gallery and throw them up on FaceBook and Instagram.

So here are 5 cartoons (with submission date) that I withdrew today (March 23, 2020), starting from oldest to newest.

Submitted: Feb, 20, 2020

Ditto Birds

Submitted: Feb. 29, 2020

That Hat

Submitted: March 1, 2020

Start All Over

Submitted: March 8, 2020

While You’re At It

Submitted: March 12, 2020

Nobody But ME

What I’ve Learned from my Eleven Year Shit Show

I’ve reblogged posts from my neice, Linda before. She always has something to say, and it’s never based on vicarious experience. She’s generous, direct, and funny. So, from the bottom of my heart – via my funny bone – I share this post for your benefit and for the possible benefit of those in your circles just in case you sense any tangible or intangible applicability.

LindaBP

I spent the entire weekend documenting everything I’ve tried for my MS. Thank God for iCal, my Amazon order history and the “purchase” file I keep in my email app. I’m not surprised by the vast majority of medicines, therapies and equipment as much as I’m shocked at what I forgot. For example I literally had no memory of taking an expensive medication as well as many treatments until stumbling upon them in my digital calendar.

At this point I need to stop, post and hit publish. Over the next few weeks I’ll be describing what’s been working for me these last two years. In the meantime if you have a specific question about what I’ve tried at any point feel free to ask in the comment section or message me.

And no, I didn’t have the courage to tally up how much this has cost me out of pocket.

One…

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