About portfoliolongo.com

ARTIST'S STATEMENT: I want my artwork to comfort the afflicted and to afflict the comfortable. I want it to shed light and call attention to beauty, coherence, and unity; and, I want it to cast doubt on falsehoods, oversimplifications, and absurdities. I’d like to be instrumental in deepening our awareness and appreciation of the fullness of life, including its complexities, ambiguities, and paradoxes. I draw and paint on an iPad with an Apple Pencil or my fingers using a variety of drawing/painting apps; although, I still work in wood and clay as well. iPads are portable and versatile, require little set up, and there’s no clean up. They’re the perfect medium for what I do. I can quickly convert ideas into illustrations and share them or time-lapse videos of them on social media. I can also prepare the images for printing on metal, paper, and canvas surfaces in a variety of sizes. BIOGRAPHY: Paul Longo has lived a relatively unconventional life. In his youth, he plowed through dyslexia (before teachers had ever heard of it) and learned that there is, indeed, more than meets the eye. In college, he read Don Quijote in Spanish for the first time and discovered an interest in anthropology. He went on to complete 3 graduate degrees and has lived and worked in 7 countries and 9 states since then. Paul has taught anthropology, education, Spanish, research and evaluation methods, and ESL at 6 different universities. These days he teaches digital art to adults with developmental disabilities and non-credit ESL to adults at a local community college. Paul was also a Benedictine monk and lived in a monastery for nearly 8 years, until he met and married his wife. Together they were survivors of Hurricane Katrina as residents of New Orleans. But it was not until 2013, while living in a downtown loft in Des Moines, Iowa, that Paul complained to his wife, a CIO in higher education, about not having either a basement or a garage in which to make art. A few days later she gave Paul her old iPad with an installed drawing app and said, “here’s a studio for your lap.” Since then, not only have iPads become larger and more powerful, but the number of drawing and painting apps has increased and each one offers a unique set of features to create original artwork. Nowadays, Paul takes his "studio” everywhere he goes. Throughout his eclectic journey, Paul has created and shared his art to make sense of the world, to give voice to new identities and experiences, and to engage more intentionally with others. To view more of Paul Longo’s works, digital and otherwise, visit his social media sites: www.portfoliolongo.com, twitter, YouTube, Instagram: @plongeaux, Facebook: Paul J. Longo

Wise Guy

Annyth and I were talking about potato chips the other day, and she recalled that, when she would visit her grandmother in the Greater Pittsburgh area, she’d always look forward to having some Wise Potato Chips at one point or another. She had her own local Chicago favorite, Jays, barbecue style! But when it comes to potato chips, I’ve always been a Wise guy! So, once again, we rendezvoused back there on Memory Lane! All that prompted the following:

Once again, these were done on an iPad with the help of an Apple Pencil, Sketch Club app, and some digital tweaking in the iColorama app.

One of our juiciest investments

Several days ago someone dropped off about a dozen freshly picked lemons. Today I made a batch of lemon sorbet using the 3 cups of juice they rendered and some zest. I used the juicer Annyth and I bought a couple of months after moving here to Merced in California’s Central Valley in 2014. I’ve used it to squeeze grapefruits, oranges, lemons, limes, and even pomegranates. Thank you for your service.

Done on an iPad Pro with an Apple Pencil using Sketch Club and then iColorama.

My Neighbor’s 1950 Chevrolet 3100

A few days ago my neighbor brought out his beautifully restored 1950 Chevrolet 3100, and dressed it up to take part in Merced, CA’s Annual Fire and Kops for Kids activities, targeting families with children aged 12 and under. Here’s a YouTube video of another similarly restored beauty.

Click on image to enlarge.

Our Annual Christmas Letter: X

Well, it’s that time of year again, yes, even given the pandemic and dystopia. Our 2020 Christmas Letter is X. What do you think? It works, doesn’t it? Makes a long story short. Check out our previous Annual Christmas Letters in our archives.

As always, everyone here at portfoliolongo.com wishes you the very best over the holidays and in the new year, and if applicable, Merry Christmas.

Juanjo Domínguez (1951-2019)

If you’re not familiar with Juanjo Domíguez, Argentine guitarist, then check him out. Below the digital painting I did of Maestro Juanjo on an iPad using Sketch Club, I’ve inserted a YouTube video of him accompanying Diego el Cigala and Andrés Calamaro performing Los Hermanos by Atahualpa Yupanqi. Enjoy!
I’m adding another YouTube link that perhaps better illustrates Maestro Juanjo’s playing (along side one of my favorite singers, Diego el Cigala): click here to watch Soledad.

Click on image to enlarge.

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Chef Croz

I’m guessing that I’d like his rye bread as much as his voice, guitar playing, creativity, and audacity. Yea, I follow the legendary David Crosby on Twitter; and, I’ve tried rendering his mug elsewhere on the illustroblog. He recently (11/9/20) tweeted a photo of himself standing before what he says is his first loaf of rye bread, crediting David Nuell, whom I’m guessing made the photo.

Done on an iPad Pro using an Apple Pencil in Sketch Club with a tweak or two in iColorama. Sketch Book stats indicate that I used 4,327 brush strokes, 130 undos, and 1 hour, 44 minutes. I made a dumb mistake using multiple layers. I added a black background color to sketch out Croz independent of the kitchen back drop, which I did separately and first. Unfortunately, I didn’t sketch Croz on a third layer, rather, I did him over the black background fill of the second layer, which blocked out the kitchen backdrop. So I had to scramble. My advice: think through stuff, and check your layers frequently. I know, on one hand, I could have spent more time on this, on the other, I could have been looser and more playful and cut the time in half. It is what it is. Here’s a screen shot of the reference tweet/photo crediting David Nuell:

Screen Shot