If the linguist in Arrival spoke Pittsburghese

I never ever thought I’d hear anyone say “Sapir-Whorf hypothesis” in a movie, but I heard it in Arrival! Ok, it was a science fiction film. See trailer here. Linguistics professor Louise Banks (Amy Adams) is asked to help the United States communicate with aliens, and she’s the one who talks about the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis.

I liked the movie, but something inside me made me wonder how it would have been different if Professor Banks had been fluent in Pittsburghese. See yinz.

What do yinz want?

Tayasui Sketches, iPad Pro, Apple Pencil

Step Right Up

I reversed the order of the lines in this quote from theologian, Reinhold Niebuhr to dramatize the crescendo of his interpretation and the structure of the effort implied. Please click here to see the quote in its original sequence.

step right up

Nēnē

Branta sandvicensis, also known as nēnē and Hawaiian goose, is a species of goose found on the Hawaiian Islands. We certainly saw our share. They’re tagged because they’re endangered. I wanted a proper reference photo, and did I ever hit the jackpot with this one on Flickr.

 nēnē

iPad Pro, Apple Pencil, Procreate