Sketches’ Paintbrush & Watercolor Brush Lesson

Here’s a snapshot of yesterday’s digital art class focusing on 2 new brushes, new since we upgraded from the free version to the pro version of Sketches. We spent quite a bit of time on the mechanics of increasing and decreasing both the size and opacity of these two new brushes.

Jan 29 2-16

As an illustration, I had prepared this painting the night before using only Sketches’ paintbrush and watercolor brush:
dig art class

This was a lot to take on, but the folks in the class hung in there and ultimately produced some promising works.

See image for the reference photo credit.
Stay tuned for a closer look at what the Enrichment Centers create.

Lesson Pre-Plan

These drawing apps are complicated; sometimes in their potential simplicity, sometimes in their actual complexity. I’m working on a lesson for my next class focusing on ONLY two of the many Sketches tools, the mechanical pencil and the airbrush. This is currently the only app we’re working with.
Tools
We’ll do some warm-ups and then practice settings in size and opacity for each, then play around with some simple figures, e.g., cube, sphere, cone, etc. along with some strokes, movements, and feels. Then we’ll attempt the eye again using only these two tools.
annyth's beautiful eye

Sketches, Sty-HD stylus

Is there an anthropologist in the house?

Here I am in the Firestone waiting room again, and it’s an expensive wait. I brought my iPad and just started drawing one the ideas that I have listed on my Evernote list of drawing ideas. The item on the list was this: an anthropologist saying, I’d like to talk to you about your familiarity. The great Gary Larson has done some funny cartoons about anthropologists in tribal contexts. So, I knew I wanted to underscore the relative absurdity by using a contemporary, family, living room setting.

Half way through the drawing my stylus had a flat. This is, as they say, a whole nother story, this topic of styluses. I’m using some pretty basic styluses, nothing battery operated or fancy. They’re built in such a way that the tip isn’t really a tip; it’s a bulbus nubby kind of tip-ish sort of thing made of some sort of special material and meant to impersonate the finger…a small finger. At any rate, my rounded, bulb of a nub kinda went flat.

Now I know I need to carry a back up, especially when I’m in a waiting room.

Behind the scenes here is the notion of “familiarity.” I’m not knocking anthropologists. Familiarity is a tricky concept. There is something to be said of the unique role that anthropologists play in facilitating the familiarization of familiarity, not unlike the role of a midwife in some respects.

This time, because of the flat stylus, I spent very little digital attention on the faces. I kinda’ like that effect. I’ll try that again on purpose.

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