Bobby D’s

Annyth and I lived in New Orleans, LA from early 2005 to early 2010, in with Katrina out with the Saints winning the Super Bowl! For most of that time we were lucky enough to live in Algiers Point. Looking back, I really wish I had been iPad drawing then, because it was probably the most interesting place I’ve ever lived. Whenever I go through my own photos from back then or if I bump into one on the Internet, I’m slowly but surely using them as reference photos for free hand iPad drawings to post on this illustroblog along with a little story. Here’s a few posts on Jack Fine, Kevin & Wendy’s House of the Rising Sun B&B, and the Missbelieve Tree (or Miss P’leeze Tree or even Loquat Tree) tagged #Algiers Pernt.

Case in “pernt,” couple’a years ago I happened upon a unique photo on Flickr by a Chuck Taggart. Click here for that photo. Setting the stage, he writes: [The store hours sign outside this little neighborhood grocery represents one of those “only in New Orleans” kinda things. My favorite hours-of-operation sign EVER. I was driving around in the Point and had a hankering for a Hubig’s Pie, and thought I’d stop into Bobby D’s. I was pushing it; it was a little after 5. No dice.]

Note: If you do go to that photo, you’ll see my request to use Chuck Taggart’s photo as a reference photo for the following iPad Pro painting, done mostly the Sletch Club app using an Apple Pencil.

Comments always welcome (down below). Here’s to Chuck Taggart, ethnographer and photographer.

Bobby D’s Hours

Jack Fine at the Old Point Bar in Algiers Point

In 2005 Ann and I moved to New Orleans and wound up buying a house in Algiers Point, 420 Alix St. to be exact. I especially loved the “420” part from the start. Good thing because, little did we know, Hurricane Katrina hit four months after we got there, but that’s another story. A few weeks before Ann and Jaxin showed up in late April, I had already moved in and started getting as much ready around the house as possible for their arrival. On my second night there, I strolled down to the Old Point Bar just a few blocks away. There was live music, so I found a place at the bar and ordered a beer. I can’t remember the name of the band, but I loved their sound. I sat there sipping my beer and listening to the music, and all of a sudden, the guy sitting next to me – at the bar – started playing his trumpet, kinda’ just like this (see Short Clip). Yes, he started playing his trumpet from his seat at the bar right next to me! I remember thinking, “live fucking music!”

That man’s name was Jack Fine. Look him up! He’s a legend. I’m not the one to tell you who he is or who he was. I just know he’s been all over. We talked during a break, and every time I’d see him after that, on a regular basis here and there, we’d greet each other and continue the same conversation. I got to meet the man before the legend.

I was thinking about Jack Fine earlier today, so I searched Google for a photo so I could sped some time with him, drawing him from a reference photo from this source. Ladies and gentlemen, Jack Fine:

Jack Fine

Jack Fine

If you know Jack Fine or of you’re familiar with his music/life, please use the comment section to share your two cents. Here’s the more recent piece I’ve found on Jack, age 91 (Aug. 2020). Thank you.

Technical; I drew the image free hand using the photo at the embedded link above on an iPad Pro with an Apple Pencil using the Sketch Club app along with a tweak or two in a cool iPad app called iColorama.

House of the Rising Sun Bed and Breakfast

In two days we’ll be flying to Cuba, but that’s another story.

Today was our last full day going down Memory Lane in Algiers Point, New Orleans, where we had lived from 2005 to 2010. As Annyth says, we were “in with Katrina and out with the Super Bowl.” It goes without saying that those were some life-changing years! From the very beginning – and to this day – we’ve had a special attachment to House of the Rising Sun Bed and Breakfast and its proprietors, Kevin and Wendy. In fact, they’ll be our travelmates on the upcoming tour.

We first met Wendy and Kevin in February of 2005, when we stayed at their B & B while we were closing on a house just around the corner from them (See The Misbelieve Tree.) As new residents of Algiers Point, we became friends with them, and through them, many others. Here we are “strolling” as the Monopoly Board in the French Quarter on Mardi Gras in 2009. The friendship and the story…to be continued.


Side by side, photo referenced, freehand iPad drawing in the Procreate app using Sty-HD stylus.

The Misbelieve Tree

Watching the final episode of Treme last night on HBO reminded me of the richness and incomparability of New Orleans and the life-changing 5 years that my wife and I spent living, working, and redefining ourselves there from 2005 to 2010, roughly the same timeline that David Simon and Eric Overmyer followed in the creation of Treme. We had been there just under 6 months before Hurricane Katrina hit. That portion of my experience and memory will forever be eclipsed by the following 4 and a half years dedicated one way or another to one form or another of rebuilding.  Treme helped me begin to make sense of the fullness of that experience, which I wouldn’t trade for anything in the world. New Orleans is an incomparable city in so many ways, and it has an enormous lesson to teach the rest of the world; and Treme, if I may generalize, should be a central component of the curriculum.

Last night’s final episode of Treme coaxed out a pre-Katrina memory. I was reminded of one of the many trees that we had to have removed from our property in Algiers Point, one of the few things we got done BK (Before Katrina).  Some folks in the neighborhood called this tree a misbelieve tree or a misplease tree. It was, in fact, a Eriobotrya japonica or loquat tree, which some called a Japanese plum tree. Its trunk had been damaged, it leaned very much, and the arborist said it had to go.  Those names, I’ve read, are associated with the tree’s name in either French or Italian. I’m not sure. Any ideas out there?

image

You’ll see this tree in living color 15 seconds into the following short video that I put together (images and terribly slow soundtrack) to celebrate our selling the property, which I’ve been told was the last house to sell in the Western Hemisphere in the summer of 2008!